Doctoral Student Awards and Grants

Congratulations to these doctoral students for successfully competing for fellowships and awards!
Matthew Archer received a research Fulbright vis-à-vis the Bourse de la Confederation Suisse, funded by the Swiss Government. He received a MacMillan Geneva Exchange Scholarship and a Council on African Studies Summer Research Grant from the Yale MacMillan Center. He’s also received a Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies grant.  His academic interests include economic geography, environmental anthropology, value theory, development economics, natural resources, labor, global supply chains, pollution, urban planning, China, Africa. His major advisor is Professor Michael R. Dove.

 



 
 
Archer Matthew
Samara Brock
Samara Brock received a four-year Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Doctoral Fellowship (2014-2018) for her research on leveraging multi-stakeholder governance to reduce the impact of mining on food and fisheries systems in British Columbia and Alaska. Samara also received the 2015 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation scholarship, considered the most prestigious doctoral award for the social sciences and humanities in Canada. Her major advisor is Professor Karen Hébert.
Robert Buchkowski received the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada PGS-D Award and a summer research grant from the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies. Robert's research focuses on the impact of animal species on the nitrogen cycle. He is particularly interested in how feedbacks between animals eating plants and animals eating plant litter modify the movement and availability of nitrogen within terrestrial ecosystems. A central goal of his research is to improve our understanding of how animal species contribute to ecosystem function. His major advisor is Professor Oswald Schmitz.
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Mary Burak received the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (NSF GRFP) in 2016. She studies the trade-offs between landscape development and biodiversity conservation in East Africa; and landcape genetics. Her major adivsor is Professor Oswald J. Schmitz.
Deepti Chatti studies how rural households in India make energy decisions, particularly studying the transitions from traditional biomass cookstoves to new technologies and fuels. Her doctoral work has thus far been supported by the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). She received the Yale South Asian Studies Summer Research Awards for Graduate Students to work on her research in the Summer of 2015 in India. Her major advisors are Professor Michael Dove at the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, and Professor K. Sivaramakrishnan at the Department of Anthropology.
Chatti Deepti
Marlyse Duguid's research explores the mechanisms and processes driving understory plant community dynamics in temperate forests. She is primarily interested in plant community response to forest harvesting. Her research has an applied component, and may inform sustainable forest management and biodiversity conservation in managed temperate forests. Marlyse received the Best Student Scientific Presentation and 3rd place Student Scientific Presentation at the SAF National Convention in 2012 and 2014. Marlyse received the Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Doctoral Research Award in 2014, Andrew M. Greller Graduate Student Award in 2014, the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies in 2011 and in 2015, the Lewis B. Cullman Fellowship (2011-2016), and the Society for Ecological Restoration Award in 2015. Her major advisor is Professor Mark Ashton.
Marlyse
Jenalle Eck is a visiting doctoral student working with Professor Liza Comita. Jenalle is broadly interested in the ecological processes that shape patterns of abundance, distribution, and regeneration in natural and disturbed plant communities. For her PhD, she is studying the interactions between tropical trees and their microbes (particularly soil-borne pathogens) in Panama, as well as the consequences of these interactions for tropical tree population dynamics and microbial community diversity. Her research links experimental, observational, and genetic studies to address novel hypotheses regarding tropical tree and microbial dynamics and diversity. She received the Smithsonian Institution Predoctoral Fellowship (2015).
Jenalle Eck
Michaela Foster received the Yale Center for Business and the Environment Sobotka Faculty-Student Research Grant. She is interested in environmental governance, forest conservation, and development. Her research focuses on how global influences impact land use change, local livelihoods, and domestic policies in the tropics. Her major advisor is Professor Ben Cashore.
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Jennifer Hoyle received the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Doctoral Pilot Grant in 2013, Yale F&ES Doctoral Program Travel Grants in 2013 and 2014, and is currently a co-leader of an interdisciplinary project focused on payments for watershed services supported by The National Science Foundation's Socio-Evironmental Synthesis Center, which includes a fellowship from the center. Her research is focused on measuring and modeling the fate and transport of dissolved carbon, nutrients and suspended sediment in large river networks. Her major advisor is Professor James Saiers.
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Sarah Jasmine Hyman received the Yale Climate and Energy Institute Policy Workshop Grant, the Yale Center for Business and Environment Sobotka Faculty-Student Research Grant, National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program, funding from the Yale Center for Environmental Law & Policy and was named a 2015 recipient of Switzer Environmental Fellowship, a prestigious program that supports future environmental leaders. Jasmine is investigating the benefit flows in climate change mitigation schemes and the conditions for sustainable development amongst the rural poor. Her major advisor is Professor Robert Bailis.
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Lan Jin received a Yale Hixon Fellowship from the Yale Hixon Center for Urban Ecology, a Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Research Grant, a Yale Istitute for Biospheric Studies Pilot Grant, and a Summer Travel and Research Grant from the Yale Council on East Asian Studies. Lan's research focuses on the impact of air pollution on adverse birth outcomes, including birth defects, preterm births, and low birth weight in Lanzhou city, China. Her major advisor is Professor Michelle Bell.
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Alder Keleman's research explores the contributions made by agrobiodiversity (or native and traditional crops) to household food security and food culture in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Her previous research explored the social, economic, and policy determinants of the conservation of maize diversity in Mexico. Alder received the P.E.O Award, a merit-based award for women of the United States and Canada who are pursuing a doctoral level degree at an accredited college or university. Her major advisors are Professor Karen Hébert and Professor Michael Dove.
alder keleman

Jill Kelly received the 2015 Yale Graduate School Public Service Award for Community Service for her volunteer work and outreach with the New Haven community. Jill is a parent activist and volunteer in the New Haven Public Schools.  She is the vice president of the parent-teacher organization at the Engineering Science University Magnet School (ESUMS), where she teaches python programming and helps coach the middle school’s award-winning math team.  Jill received a Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Doctoral Pilot Grant (2014) and the New Haven Public Schools TAPS Award for Public Service (2014).   At Yale, Jill works on the spatial and statistical analysis of LiDAR data in forest biomass estimation.  Her research investigates how choices made about data collection, computer processing, and statistical methods can affect the quality of biomass estimates for boreal forests.  Her major advisor is Professor Timothy Gregoire.

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Meghna Krishnadas received the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Small Grant Award, Yale FES Conference Travel Grants, the Handsel Scholarship for PhD studies in conservation from the Wildlife Conservation Network, Conservation, Food, and Health Grant for Conservation, Rufford Small Grant for Nature Conservation, and the Beatley Fund for travel and research. Meghna studies the ecological and landscape factors governing recruitment of seeds and seedlings in fragmented humid tropical forests in India. She uses community ecology theory to understand which processes change in forests that are broken up due to land-use change and how this affects tree community dynamics. This research will provide insights into forest succession and regeneration to inform forest restoration in multiple-use landscapes. Her major advisor is Professor Liza Comita.
Krishnadas Meghna
Max Lambert received a Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies pilot grant and the Garden Club of American Coastal Wetlands Studies Award. Max studies the relative role of environment and genetics on sexual development in wildlife. In particular, Max looks at sex ratio differences and endocrinology of developing frogs along a gradient of rural, forested landscapes to intensely-developed suburban landscapes. His major advisor is Professor David Skelly.
Lambert Maxime
Myles Lennon's research focuses on the intersections of techno-scientific knowledge and participatory organizing practices in the U.S. climate movement. Myles is a combined PhD student at the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the Department of Anthropology. He was selected as a 2015 Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellow. His major advisors are Professor Karen Hébert and Profesor Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan.
Lennon Myles
Tamar Makov received the Sobotka Collaborative Research Grant from the Yale Center for Business and the Environment in 2016 for her research on function-based substitution between new and used products and the use of behavioral experiments in evaluating the efficacy of green marketing claims. She received a Doctoral Discovery Award in 2016 and a Doctoral Discovery Grant in 2015 from Yale Institute of Biospheric Studies. She also received the Society of Industrial Ecology Travel Fund in 2013. Her research focuses on the intersection between business and sustainability; where she combines big-data analysis with macro level behavioral experiments in an attempt to gain insight on sustainable consumption and drivers for sustainable behavior. Her major advisor is Professor Marian Chertow.
Makov Tamar
Fjodor Melnikov received the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Fellowship. Fjodor is working with Professor Paul Anastas to elucidate safer chemical design guidelines. His major advisors are Professor Julie Zimmerman and Professor Paul Anastas.
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Meredith (Atwood) Holgerson received the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Doctoral Improvement Dissertation Grant in 2014, Society of Freshwater Science General Endowment Award in 2014, Village Garden Club of Dennis Research Grant in 2014, Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies matching grant for use in the Earth System Center for Stable Isotopic Studies in 2014, Friends of Chatham Waterways Lewis E. Kimball Scholarship in 2012 and 2014, Sigma Xi Grant-in-Aid of Research in 2013, Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Small Grant Award in 2012, Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Research Support in 2012, and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (2011-2014). Meredith researches the ecology of temporary ponds. She is particularly interested in how terrestrial inputs (e.g. leaf litter) to ponds affect oxygen availability, carbon cycling, and food web dynamics. Her major advisor is Professor David Skelly.
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Alexandria Moore received a Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Pilot Grant in 2013, Connecticut Sea Grant from UConn in 2013, Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies FES Doctoral Research Grant in 2013 and 2014. Her research investigates the relationship between species interactions and ecosystem functioning. Specifically, she is interested in understanding how restoring trophic structure might influence the restoration of ecosystem functioning in New England salt marshes. Her major advisor is Professor Oswald Schmitz.
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Amruta Nori-Sarma received the US Fulbright-Nehru Student Research Fellowship (2012-2013), the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Grant in 2013 and 2014, the Yale John F. Enders fellowship in 2014, the Yale Tropical Resources Institute fellowship in 2015 and 2016, the Yale MacMillan International Dissertation Research fellowship in 2016, the Air and Waste Management Association's Air Quality Research and Study Award in 2016, and the US Environmental Protection Agency's Science to Achieve Results (STAR) award in 2016. Amruta studies extreme heat waves and urban heterogeneity in air pollution exposures, and resulting impacts on human health in India. Her major advisor is Professor Michelle Bell.

 

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Chelsea Judy received the Yale Center for Business and the Environment Sobotka Faculty-Student Research Grant in 2016 with Michaela Foster and thier advisor, Professor Ben Cashore.
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Sayd Randle's research examines transitions in spatial politics and water management in Los Angeles. Her work has been funded by the Wenner-Gren Dissertation Fieldwork Grant, the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Doctoral Dissertation Grant, the Yale Hixon Center for Urban Ecology Fellowship, and the Yale John F. Enders Fellowship. Sayd is a student in the combined F&ES and Anthropology program, and she is co-advised by Professor Karen Hébert and Professor K. Sivaramakrishnan.
syad randle
Noah Sokol studies how various features of global environmental change, such as land use change and the spread of invasive species, impact the terrestrial carbon cycle. Noah is the recipient of a Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada PGS-D award (2012-2016), the Michael Lefor PhD Grant from the Connecticut Association for Wetland Science (2015), and two Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Doctoral Pilot Grants in 2013 and 2014. His interests also extend into environmental journalism and multimedia. As part of a team of multi-disciplinary Yale graduate students, Noah received a grant from the Mellon Collaborative for Southern Appalachian and Place-Based Studies (2015) to produce an interactive web-based documentary on the Maze District of Canyonlands National Park in Utah. His major advisor is Professor Mark Bradford.
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Nikki Springer has received the US EPA-STAR Fellowship, Berkeley Conservation Fellowship, and Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Dissertation Seed Grant. Nikki is aslo a Yale Institute for Social and Policy Studies Fellow. Her major advisor is Professor Alex Felson.
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Eleanor Stokes has received a NASA Harriet Jenkins Fellowship, a Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Student Fellowship, and a Graduate Student Assembly Travel Fellowship for her dissertation research examining the relationship between urban structure and energy use.  Using nighttime lights remote sensing imagery, this research will help to increase understanding of how different urbanization processes produce different consumption typologies.  Her major advisor is Professor Karen Seto.
Megan Sullivan received the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (NSF GRFP) in 2016. She studies tropical ecology and community deversity mechanisms. Her major advisor is Professor Liza Comita.
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Peter Umunay received the Russell E. Train Fellowship from WWF’s Education for Nature Program. Peter’s research focuses on monitoring, reporting and verification system of REDD+ activities in Congo basin forests. Through a combination of remote sensing and field data, Peter's research intends to respond to the challenges of designing scientifically credible, accurate, cost-effective, practical and transparent national-scale systems able to quantify, monitor and report carbon stocks and human-induced emissions in Congo basin forests. The application of these data will help build a model that links activities causing forest lost to underlying drivers, and construct reference scenarios to determine the scope for emission reductions. Read his interview with WWF Forest & Climate Programme to learn more about his research. His major advisor is Professor Timothy Gregoire.
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Xuan Zhemin
Zhemin Xuan received a Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Fellowship. His dissertation focuses on the linkage between copper speciation and variations in water quality characteristics and the impact of land use/land cover (LULC) on surface hydrology, vegetation and microclimate in urbanizing watersheds. His major advisor is Professor Gaboury Benoit.
Bryan Yoon received the F&ES Student 2013 Inaugural Bormann Prize, established to honor research that builds on the legacy of the longtime F&ES professor who died in 2012. Bryan received the prize for a 2012 study that revealed the staggering amount of organic matter released into a New York reservoir during Hurricane Irene a year earlier. Bryan’s dissertation research focuses on developing a regional scale model that can effectively describe both quantitative and qualitative dynamics of organic carbon transport in fresh water systems. His major advisor is Professor Peter Raymond.
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Lily Zeng received the Yale MacMillan Center International Dissertation Research Grants in 2015 Council on East Asian Studies Field Research Grant in 2014, Tropical Resources Institute Fellowship in 2014, Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Fellowship in 2014, National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program in 2012, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Postgraduate Scholarship for Doctoral Students in 2012, U.S. Fulbright Scholar to China – (which she had to decline because she had won so many other awards!) in 2012 and most recently, she received a National Geographic Young Explorers Grant. Lily is studying the changing relationship between indigenous communities and their traditionally protected sacred forests, its effect on land use practices, and its ecological implications for biodiversity conservation. Her research is based in Xishuangbanna, an area that contains the world’s northernmost tropical rain forest and China’s richest biodiversity. This work seeks to understand when and how community goals for protecting sacred forests are compatible with conservation goals, which is important for engaging with conservation science and policy-making in a way that can conserve biodiversity while still allowing for cultural self-determination. Watch Lily describing her research in just only 90 seconds. Her major advisors are Professor Karen Hébert and Dr. Charles Peters of the New York Botanical Garden.
Juan Carlos Penagos Zuluaga received an F&ES Yale Instistute for Biospheric Studies Fellowship. Juan studies systematics, evolution and conservation of trees, using Neotropical genera of the family Lauraceae as a model group, as well as related ecological and conservation questions in temperate and tropical regions. His major advisors are Professor Liza Comita and Dr. Simon Queenborough.
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